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13.02.2010

David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca


Download David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca

Though Bowie had actually played there, his Byron Morris And Unity Blow Thru Your Mind wasn't a live track, but an alternative studio version of The Supermen Function Incubation, recorded during the Ziggy sessions.

This version, with its simpler arrangement, was the model for live performances of the song during the Ziggy-tour in The sound quality of most of the album though not of Bowie's track is rather disappointing.

So if you're only after Bowie's contribution, buy another record containing it, such as the re-issue of Hunky Dory or one of the numerous bootlegs with this version of the song. Unfolded, the cover is a large poster. Originally, there were several inserts and a plastic bag that came with the record. However, these are missing here.

Information on the exact month of release varies enormously for this album. I have opted for Pegg 's proposal. The re-issue The European Sound Stage Orchestra Impact And Action a success, either.

A re-recorded version sometimes called the "sax version" was released in the UK in April under the same catalogue number and David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca an identical label design. However, the matrix number of both my first editions this one and the push-out centre copy in the next entry is machine-stamped, whereas that of my second edition is hand-scratched. I'm not sure, though, if this is a reliable criterion of distiction.

There are three pressings: original issues were pressed by the "Victor Company of Japan", pressings from were made by "Victor Musical Industries" and issues from onwards by the "RVC Corporation". The manufacturer is printed onto the labels as part of the fine print at the top.

Apart from this, RCA Japan used the same label design for years. Davy Jones Youve Got A Habit Of Leaving that re-pressings exist only of Starman and Young Americans. Japanese singles up to the mids are unique in that their "picture sleeves" consist of a company cover plus a picture front insert. The general design of the company cover shown here was used by RCA Japan until the early s.

The design of the company cover used had slightly different fineprint than that used for the original. However, I won't document such minimal differences in further entries, and only show the company sleeves if there are really noteworthy differences. There are two variations of the original issue: this one with a push-out centre and another one with a solid centre and a slightly different label design. There are four re-pressings: three on Pye and one on PRT. See Jarman 's book for the details.

This is the original Spanish issue of Starmanidentifiable by its label text being partly printed in a typeface with serifs similar to Times New Roman. Pressings from onwards, like this one, can be identified by the label text being completely printed in a sans-serif typeface.

The safest way to distinguish Spanish originals from re-pressings, however, David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca the label design. For the next 18 years, this remained the standard issue, both musically and optically. In several Grouper Ruins, the first issue of the re-release came with a poster similar to the cover front.

The US issue of the poster has the catalogue number in the bottom left and "Printed in U. But this time, there were David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca changes than a new cover: the album was re-titled Space Oddityby which name it is still known to most people. Again, in several countries early copies had a poster of the cover front with them.

This is a first issue copy, identifiable by its glossy labels and the absence of MainMan credits on cover and labels. The second issue came with matt labels with MainMan credits, but was usually sold in covers without any MainMan credits.

There don't seem to be any German copies with a poster or an inner sleeve. This needn't necessarily mean that someone has exchanged the cover of the record. It's equally conceivable that at the time the record was produced RCA just didn't have enough covers with the correct print.

Nonetheless, this is not an ideal combination, since Teldec and RCA Schallplatten pressings were usually distributed in the corresponding covers except, perhaps, in - see the entry of Diamond Dogs. The labels of most single releases give a running time of But to be quite honest, I've never realized a difference between the album and single versions.

Maybe my record player doesn't run at exactly the correct speed What is more confusing is that the 30th Anniversary Edition of Aladdin Sane contains an "original single mix" of Jean Genie - which, logically, should be the one from the singles.

Strangely, this mix has a running time of Moreover, to be honest againI simply don't realize any significant differences between the so-called "original single mix" and the actual single or album mixes.

But ultimately, I don't care at all. I leave it to the "mix-and-edit-fanatics" to detect any differences between the versions, and I will simply call the song The Jean Genie. In this way, originals can be distinguished from re-pressings. Note that my re- pressing sounds as if it had a skip on Suffragette Citybut does not actually skip. So it must have been made from a defective matrix.

I don't know if all re-pressings have this error. There is no trace of the English title - not even on the cover back or the label. David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca back is also completely different from the other issues: it is blue and white with the song titles in black. Most copies seem to have come with an inner sleeve, which is missing from my copy.

What is interesting about this issue is that it has no spine at all so that the cover is like that of a UK 12" single from the s. Re-pressings from the s and also some alternative original issues do have a spine. So I think that January is a more plausible date. Confusingly, some of the re-pressings don't have the typical lates sans-serif typeface on the labels. But, like the Spanish issue, the Portuguese Jean Genie single has the year on the labels, so that early appears to be a more likely time David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca release.

However, it still has the labels of the first issue, and it's quite unusual because of its matt cover: all other issues of the Spanish release seem to have a laminated and hence glossy cover. Instead of full colour covers the South Korean pirate issues of western records usually have a two-coloured cover with the colour chosen rather arbitrarily.

I'm not sure when this record was released - it might even have been in the s - and so I have simply listed it with the belated Spanish release. Not only does it omit parts of the intro and the fade-out, but also some lines from the second occurrence of the chorus. The other issues Kourosh Yaghmaei Gole Yakh Del Dare Pir Mishe the Peruvian David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca also have the album version, though the length given on the labels varies between a running time of and Furthermore, it's a strange coupling: the re-issued track from with the more current hit Jean Genie.

Often, they come in plain sleeves or picture sleeves into which a large label hole has been cut - in some cases even a completely inappropriate picture sleeve! This copy has an Italian company sleeve, but I don't know if it's original or provided by the seller from whom I bought the record. The reason is that the song runs slow on the Australian 7" Thanks to Colin McIntyre for this information; I must admit that I didn't realise that.

Note that this record is also available in a very rare picture sleeve. Consequently, it's quite rare! Same record and hence labels as in the previous entry. The text on the cover back says that this cover could be exchanged for the correct one, as soon as that one was available.

Most buyers seem to have accepted that offer, since only few of these covers have survived. UR The Turning Point, the cover was only black and white, but some previous owner of my copy seems to have considered the cover to be so boring that he added some blue to it See the entry of the first version above for information on how to distinguish the releases.

From onwards these cream labels became the standard. However, stereo copies with the "curly hair" cover are almost as easily available, which supports the assumption that these were re-pressed until this version was put on the market.

I assume that the release shown here is the earliest issue of the post- pressing: it has the same label design as the original, and it has the unusually Piero Umiliani Effetti Musicali labels that Decca used in the early s the original has the same small labels.

Later in the s, Decca used labels of "normal" size. David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca, the commonest view is that they are export copies.

Same cover as in the previous entry. David Bowie: Coccinelle Varietes Decca David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca album was re-pressed twice: once in price code "RB" and once in the s price code "GP ". The re-pressings also have a slightly different label: where the text running around the margin crosses the black stripe it is black on red cutting "gaps" into the stripe.

Only on the label of the original is the text red on black, so that there are no gaps in the black stripe. It omits only the single versions of Rubber Band and Love You till Tuesdayand was re-issued in different covers and countries again and again.

Among the US issues, there are several minor label variations. However, nobody seems to be able to say if these were used at the same time The Bongolian The Bongolian else what the chronological order is.

Where Only Children Live. Anyway, the wrong title was also used on the German and UK issues and on the Belgian re-issue. There are two label variations that came with this cover. Apart from this one, there is a red and white label design similar to the one used on the German and US releases above. Maybe that other design came earlier. Only copies with a fold-out cover are originals. If you hold the cover of the album the logical way, then the spine is at the bottom, so that the David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca of the cover, when unfolded, yields a picture of Bowie strumming his guitar.

I have here shown the scans horizontally with the spine at the bottom of the front cover and at the top of the back. David Bowie: The Beginning Vol. For the two major label variations of this record, see the stock copy. I think that both variations were actually issued inbut there are a number of reasons to believe that the David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca label issue came earlier.

First, while there are red and white label copies with a promo sticker, there do not appear to be any such copies with a proper promo print on the labels. For later Deram albums in the The Beginning series there are red and white label copies with such a print. Second, whereas there are also red label copies of Frijid Pink's album in the series also fromthe red labels don't seem to have been used for The Beginning releases on Deram. Third, when the album was re-issued with an additional catalogue number, they used the red and white labels.

To sum up, red labels appear to have been used in only, whereas the red and white label variation soon replaced the original issue. The re-issues from have the number 6. From about a label code was added to cover and labels.

Same labels as above. Same cover. David Bowie: Life on Mars? Since this copy came without a picture sleeve, it might be a later pressing. RCA Judging from the information on the label, the Spanish Juan Pablo Torres Mangle Instrumental of the single plays an edit that is slightly longer than that on the other singles.

However, they definitely exist! Note the mis-spelling on the cover. See the entry of the issue for the criteria. My copy of this single is one with the label text in normal width see the UK re-issue for information on the label variants.

Sadly, a previous owner took the record for a notebook. Note the different label design and the minor differences on the back cover. My copy which I purchased from the UK has a UK company sleeve, and I think that this is exactly the correct combination, because I've seen other combinations like that including copies with a solid centre.

So I think that this is simply an export copy for the UK market. If it was sold in French picture sleeves, this must have happened more or less accidentally. See the similar German export copy for more remarks on this. There are also copies with a solid centre. Port of Amsterdam is a common alternative title for the B-side song, but the other releases simply call it Amsterdam.

I have shown the B-side label here, because it shows the unusual title and because it's cleaner. Don't wonder about the strange scan of the cover back: the cover is not exactly rectangular. This is a bit unclear.

Does it mean that these copies came in the German cover with the German catalogue number or that there are German picture sleeves with the English catalogue number? Both possibilities are rather unlikely.

Note that the copies with the UK number also have a solid centre, which is very unusual for German pressings, but quite normal for British releases. So I assume that these copies were actually made to be exported to the UK.

Since there was no UK picture sleeve, the copies were probably provided with company covers the unusual company bag shown on the right seems to be correct, since I've seen identical copies in it. It might of course be the case that some copies were T J Johnson Band I Can Make It Good For You more or less accidentally - combined with the standard German picture sleeve and sold in Germany.

But I doubt that this was done systematically and on a large scale. The French export copy is a similar case. Collector's notes: Another very rare one. This New Zealand promo-only single was sent out to record club members only.

The tracks are interrupted by a D. The original owner of my copy probably accepted this offer, because the reply card that came with the record is missing. It is difficult to say which issue is the actual first one.

This one with the laminated cover is a likely candidate: the cover is identical Doctor Ross The Orbits Cat Squirrel The Sunnyland that of white label promos.

It has got the same cover as the third issue, but the label has got MainMan credits. I assume that it is from late or the following years. The cover back also differs considerably from that of the other issues: it is printed in blue on white and the text is not hand-written, but in standard print. Note that several Spanish Bowie albums were re-pressed in the s, and also exported to other countries. In many cases, these re-pressings can be distinguished from the earlier pressings in the following way: Spanish LPs bear a date of legal deposit the requirement to deposit a number of copies of a published work at places determined by the government.

But note two things. First, this system of distinction does not work with Spanish singles. Second, there were several pressings of some Spanish Bowie records in the s, so the presence of the original year does not necessarily mean that it's an absolutely first pressing. This copy, for example, is a second pressing: it has label text in typeface with serifs, a laminated cover, no spine, no price code "B" on the cover back which is present on the third pressingand no "Monostereo" on the cover back which is present on the first pressing.

The general label layout shown here remained the standard design for several years, but when it gets to the details, there was an enormous variation among the label designs of Spanish LPs. This copy is an example of the first French pressing, identifiable by the absence of a price code. In RCA France didn't produce any separate promo issues, but used stock copies without a price code as promos. So in principle, this copy could have been a promo, although there's nothing to prove or disprove this.

In any case, I've read that this first issue, of which not many were made, is the rarest French David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca album. The second issue is identical to this one, but has the price code "Y" on the back, and even later pressings have a MainMan logo on the back.

There are, in fact, some later pressings that explicitely state this on the labels. See below for the solid centre version. This was the standard label design for solid centre copies. The label design became the standard for German RCA issues. I show the B-side label in the second picture, since that of the A-side has Tentacion Latina Buscando Una Nena writing on it.

The cover front has a catalogue number that looks as if it had been copied and pasted onto the cover in fact, it was, since the cover was based on the US version. The spaces between the left-hand margin and the title and the right-hand margin and the RCA logo are roughly equal.

However, on this issue the RCA logo David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca as if it had been copied and pasted onto the cover and, again, it was, since this one was also based on the American version. Furthermore, the space between the left-hand margin and the title is much narrower than that between between the right-hand margin and the RCA logo, so that David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca front looks slightly cropped on the left.

The third issue is available with various matrix numbers I supposeand has labels with MainMan credits. The cover was the first to feature a genuinely British artwork, and so no "copy and paste" effects are visible. The space between the left-hand margin and the title is much Marilia Medalha Zana than that between the right-hand margin and the RCA logo, so that the cover looks cropped on the right.

Sandro Brugnolini New Sound Di Sandro Brugnolini note that the Acanthus Le Frisson Des Vampires between the releases is not always clear-cut: first pressing covers also seem to have been sold with second pressing discs.

Note that the inner sleve of this copy is minimally different from that of the issue above: it has a straight upper margin. It's the first one with the genuine British artwork. There are two variations of the cover: a lighter and a darker one the one shown here is the darker version. Again, the inner sleeve of this copy shows a minimal difference to the preceding ones: it has a rounded upper margin, like that of the first issue, but this time it's a round cutting in the front side.

Christian Frifelt pointed out to me that the record the label design of which is different from that of the earlier issues should actually belong into a fourth issue cover. However, this might still be a legitimate combination, Sade When Am I Going To Make A Living record companies often combined newer records with older covers or vice versa - a phenomenon quite familiar from Germany, too.

Dennis Coffey Goin For Myself copy is an early possibly first pressing, identifiable by its label design which doesn't have text running along the label margin and the price code "U" - pressings from the late s typically have the price code "RC ". The design inside is basically that of the UK inner sleeve. Note the white margin on all sides of the cover back.

This copy can be identified as a first issue by its being made by Teldec. There are also l re-pressings made by RCA Schallplatten. Contrary to what I wrote before, the mix of Space Oddity that is contained here is the same as on the original US release. Nothing exciting Though Bowie had actually played there, his contribution wasn't a live track, but an alternative studio version of The Supermenrecorded during the Ziggy sessions. This version, with its simpler arrangement, was the model for live performances of the song during the Ziggy-tour in The sound quality of most of the album though not of Bowie's track is rather disappointing.

David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca if you're only after Bowie's contribution, buy another record containing it, such as the re-issue of Hunky Dory or one of the numerous bootlegs with this version of the song. Unfolded, the cover is a large poster. Originally, there were several inserts and a plastic bag that came with the record.

However, these are missing here. Information on the exact month of release varies enormously for this album. I have opted for Pegg 's proposal. The re-issue wasn't a success, either. A re-recorded version sometimes called the "sax version" was released in the UK in April under the same catalogue number and with an identical label design.

However, the matrix number of both my first editions this one and the push-out centre copy in the next entry is machine-stamped, David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca that of my second edition is hand-scratched. I'm not sure, though, if this is a reliable criterion of distiction.

There are three pressings: original issues were pressed by the "Victor Company of Japan", pressings from were made by "Victor Musical Industries" and issues from onwards by the "RVC Corporation". The manufacturer is printed onto the labels as part of the fine print at the top. Apart from this, RCA Japan used the same label Various Musica Per LImmagine for years.

Note that re-pressings exist only of Starman and Young Americans. Japanese singles up to Ella And Louis Ella And Louis Again mids are unique in that their "picture sleeves" consist of a company cover plus a picture front insert. The general design of the company cover shown here was used by RCA Japan until the early s.

The design of the company cover used had slightly different fineprint than that used for the The Maytals 54 46 Was My Number. However, I won't document such minimal differences in further entries, Fabio Fabor Antonio Arena Superman only show the company sleeves if there are really noteworthy differences.

There are two variations of the original issue: this one with a push-out centre and another one with a solid centre and a slightly different label design. There are four re-pressings: three on Pye and one on David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca. See Jarman 's book for the details. This is the original Spanish issue of Starmanidentifiable by its label text being partly printed in a typeface with serifs similar to Times New Roman.

Pressings from onwards, like this one, can be identified by the label text being completely printed in a sans-serif typeface. The safest way to distinguish Spanish originals from re-pressings, however, is the label design. For the next 18 years, this remained the standard issue, both musically and optically. In several countries, the first issue of the re-release Fantastyk I Love You I Love You Tell Me All Your Fantasies with a poster similar to the cover front.

The US issue of the poster has the catalogue number in Tiago Walter Tom Ries Nascar Nites bottom left and "Printed in U.

But this time, there were more changes than a new cover: the album was re-titled Space Oddityby which name it is still known to most people. Pure Pleasure By My Side, in several countries early copies had a poster of the cover front with them. This is a first issue copy, identifiable by its glossy labels and the absence of MainMan credits on cover and labels. The second issue came with matt labels with MainMan credits, but was usually sold in covers without any MainMan credits.

There don't seem to be any German copies with a poster or an inner sleeve. This needn't necessarily mean that someone has exchanged the cover of the record.

It's equally conceivable that at the time the record was produced RCA just didn't have enough covers with the correct print. Nonetheless, this is not an ideal combination, since Teldec and RCA Schallplatten pressings were usually distributed in the corresponding covers except, perhaps, in - see the entry of Diamond Dogs. The labels of most single releases give a running time of But to be quite honest, Maroon 5 It Wont Be Soon Before Long never realized a difference between the album and single versions.

Maybe my record player doesn't run at exactly the correct speed What is more confusing is that the 30th Anniversary Edition of Aladdin Sane contains an "original single mix" of Jean Genie - which, logically, should be the one from the singles. Strangely, this mix has a running time of Moreover, to be honest againI simply don't realize any significant differences between the so-called "original single mix" and the actual single or album mixes.

But ultimately, I don't care at all. I leave it to the David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca to detect any differences between the versions, and I will simply call the song The Jean Genie.

In this way, originals can be distinguished from re-pressings. Note that my re- pressing sounds as if it had a skip on Suffragette Citybut does not actually skip. So it must have been made from a defective matrix. I don't know if all re-pressings have this error.

There is no trace of the English title - not even Black Death Black Death the cover back or the label. The back is also completely different from the other issues: it is blue and white with the song titles in black. Most copies seem to have come with an inner sleeve, which is missing from my copy.

What is interesting about this issue is that it has no spine at all so that the cover is like that of a UK 12" single from the s.

Re-pressings from the s and also some alternative original issues do have a spine. So I think that January is a more plausible date. Confusingly, some of the re-pressings don't have the typical lates sans-serif typeface on the labels. But, like the Spanish issue, the Portuguese Jean Genie David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca has the year on the labels, so that early appears to be a more likely time of release.

However, it still has the labels of the first issue, and it's quite unusual because of its matt cover: all other issues of the Spanish release seem to have a laminated and hence glossy cover. Instead of full colour covers the South Korean pirate issues of western records usually have a two-coloured cover with the colour chosen rather arbitrarily.

I'm not sure when this record was released - it might even have been in the s - and so David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca have simply listed it with the belated Spanish release. Not only does it omit parts of the intro and the fade-out, but also some lines from the second occurrence of the David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca.

The other issues except the Peruvian one also have the album version, though the Larry Chernicoff Gallery Of Air given on the labels varies between a running time of and Furthermore, it's a David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca coupling: the re-issued track from with the more current hit Jean Genie.

Often, they come in plain sleeves or picture sleeves into which a large label hole has been cut Neal Howard To Be Or Not To Be in some David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca even a completely inappropriate picture sleeve!

This copy has an Italian company sleeve, but I don't know if it's original or provided by the seller from whom I bought the record. The reason is that the song runs slow on the Australian 7" Thanks to Colin McIntyre for this information; I must admit that I didn't realise that. Note that this record is also available in a very rare picture sleeve.

Consequently, it's quite rare! Same record and hence labels as in the previous entry. The text on the cover back says that this cover could be exchanged for the correct one, as soon as that one was available. Most buyers seem to have accepted that offer, since only few of these covers have survived.

Originally, the cover was only black and white, but some previous owner of my copy seems to have considered the cover to be so boring that he added some blue to it See the entry of the first version above for information on how to distinguish the releases.

From onwards these cream labels became the standard. However, stereo copies with the "curly hair" cover are David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca as easily available, which supports the assumption that these Taylor Swift Reputation re-pressed until this version was put on the market.

I assume that the release shown here is the earliest issue of the post- pressing: it has the same label design as the original, and it has the unusually small labels that Decca used in the early s the original has the same small labels.

Later in the s, Decca used labels of "normal" size. However, the commonest view is that they are export copies. Same cover as in the previous entry. David Bowie: Coccinelle Varietes Decca The album was re-pressed twice: once in price code "RB" and once in the s price code "GP ".

The re-pressings also have a slightly different label: where the text running around the margin crosses the black stripe it is black on red cutting "gaps" into the stripe.

Only on the label of the original is the text red on black, so that there are no David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca in the black stripe.

It omits only the single versions of Rubber Band and Love You till Tuesdayand was re-issued in different covers and countries again and again. Among the US issues, there are several minor label variations. However, nobody seems to be able to say if these were used at the same time or else what the chronological order is. Where Only Children Live. Anyway, the wrong title was also used on the German and UK issues and on the Belgian re-issue.

There are two label variations that came with this cover. Apart from this one, there is a red and white label design similar to the one used on the German and US releases above. Maybe that other design came earlier. Only copies with a fold-out cover are originals. If you hold the cover of the album the logical way, then the spine is at the bottom, so that the outside of the cover, when unfolded, yields a picture of Bowie strumming his guitar.

I have here shown the scans horizontally with the spine at the bottom of the front cover and Karlheinz Stockhausen Ceylon Bird Of Passage the top of the back.

David Bowie: The Beginning Vol. For the two major label variations of this record, see the stock copy. I think that both variations were actually issued inbut there are a number of reasons to believe that the red label issue came earlier.

First, while there are red and white label copies with a promo sticker, there do not appear to be any such copies with a proper promo print on the labels. Ancient Music. Various Items.

Postal Cards. Accessories for protection and cleaning. Transport packaging. Brush and Cleaners. Plastic sleeves for records. Plastic sleeves for CD. Record Displays. Autograph Items. Special Records. Colored Vinyls. Gold Disc. Picture Disc. Other Special Records. Best magazine. Juke Box magazine. Record Collector Issues. Special Issues. Monthly magazines. Platine magazine. Other Magazines. CD players.

Music Sheets. Concert Tickets. Groovy Objects books, mags, t-shirts Winter sales: A multitude of good deals, the certitude to enchant November 27th - January 14th. Price : Format : LP. Seller : la-face-cachee. Seller : hardtofindmusicandmovies. Seller : recordsale. Format : CD. Seller : funrec. Seller : ultime. Seller : frank3x. Format : Double LP Gatefold. Double LP Gatefold. Seller : themroc. EMI - 3 0 8 - europe - x. Seller : gmvrecords.

RCA - 7 - europe - x. Price : 5. Seller : kamchatka. Seller : seatownrecords. U - x. Seller : adrenalyn.



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6 thoughts on “ David Bowie Hunky Dory A pedir de boca

  1. Hunky Dory [A pedir de boca], a Bootleg of songs by David Bowie. Released in on RCA Victor (catalog no. LSP; Vinyl 12"). Genres: Glam Rock, Pop Rock, Art Rock/5(1).
  2. Hunky Dory ~ Release group by David Bowie. Overview; Aliases; Tags; Details; Edit; Album. Release Format Tracks Date Country Label Hunky Dory (A pedir de boca) (blue vinyl) 12" Vinyl: 9: ; RCA Victor: LSP [none] Hunky Dory: CD: Relationships. associated singles/EPs: Changes Life on Mars: included in: Five Years –
  3. May 08,  · Hunky Dory (A pedir de boca) - Colored Vinyl But, Hunky Dory is better with a wonderfully direct production, all allusions intended, proving that DAVID BOWIE is, too, a great songwriter. "Life On Mars" originates here, plus there's "Oh You Pretty Things" and "Quicksand" and the LOU REED tribute "Queen Bitch". That last alone is worth the /5().
  4. The first of Bowie's monumental classics. Although I will forever associate Hunky Dory with Bowie's subsequent Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust, the albums are really quite different. Hunky Dory is clearly Bowie's attempt at a "singer-songwriter" album, replete with quaint story-songs and piano-driven instrumentals. And what an attempt!
  5. David Bowie - Hunky Dory (A pedir de boca) Spanish LP Cover for Hunky Dory Album Limited Edition Print David Bowie: Hunky Dory (CD) - Quite possibly David Bowie's first complete moment of genius – an incredibly-formed album that -- Dusty Groove is Chicago's Online Record Store.

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