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28.02.2010

Elmo Hope Sextet Informal Jazz


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Second, Hope provides original material that helps give the record its personality. Both of the standards have arrangements that would leave jazz students, and some of their teachers, tying their shoes on the Elmo Hope Sextet Informal Jazz.

This is where the merry listener gets the treat of hearing Donald Byrd, Hank Mobley, and John Coltrane introduce themselves instrumentally, the latter tenor giant making a great ride of the bridge. Everything is tight, together, and without a hitch. Squeaking mouthpieces from Mobley and Coltrane are the only casual aspects. Mathieson, Kenny []. Cookin': Hard Bop and Soul Jazz. Rosenthal, David Hard Bop: Jazz and Black Music, — Elmo Hope Sextet Informal Jazz Article Talk. Views Elmo Hope Sextet Informal Jazz Edit View history.

By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Elmo Hope Quintet, Volume 2. Trio, with John Ore bassMotion Motion Jones drums.

Trio, with Jimmy Bond bassFrank Butler drums. Hogan drums; separately. Solo piano; some tracks are duo, with Bertha Hope piano. Sounds from Rikers Island. Last Sessions — Volume One. Last Sessions — Volume Two. Lou Donaldson and Clifford Brown. Lou Donaldson. Alan Moorhouse The Big Beat Volume 2 Rollins.

Jackie McLean. Curtis Counce. Exploring the Future. Harold Land. Duke PearsonWahoo! John Coltrane. Blue Train Coltrane Time. Hank Mobley.

Year s indicated are for the recording snot first release, except for the compilation section. At the Cafe Bohemia, Vol.

They play as if in relief, as if happy it is up to them for a change. What happens is truly memorable, but it sounds more like professional musicians who have worked together many times hitting a genius moment, not a jam session. Second, Hope provides original material that helps give the record its personality.

Both of the standards have arrangements that would leave jazz students, and some of their teachers, tying their shoes on the bridge.

This is where the merry listener gets the treat of hearing Donald Byrd, Hank Mobley, and John Coltrane introduce themselves instrumentally, the latter tenor giant making a great ride of the bridge. While the album's title is another example of how cleverly labels such as this can describe what they are selling, there are really many aspects of these proceedings that are hardly informal at all.

Describing these in the order in the importance, the obvious place Elmo Hope Sextet Informal Jazz start is the drum and bass team of Philly Joe Jones and Paul Chambers.

The playing of these gentlemen here is worth the price of the record alone, even if the copy is secured from a tightwad used-record store owner somewhere in the Ozarks who only opens the doors of his establishment for gold credit card owners.

This is hardly the kind of rhythm section playing heard at a jam session, except possibly in heaven. Elmo Hope mans the piano bench at the helm of this dream team, and while the liner notes call him the "nominal leader" for the blowing date, he earns actual leader status by accomplishing two things.

First, his solo spots are the best part of the record, especially the part of "Weeja" where even Jones Elmo Hope Sextet Informal Jazz back, eventually adding some strange filigree. At this point the rhythm section seems to be Jah Saint Realizing a statement about having gone through the rigmarole of backing all the previous horn solos in an exercise that is supposed to produce great moments of jazz, but maybe didn't.

They play as if in relief, Masstishaddhu Shekinah if happy it is up to them for a change. What happens is truly memorable, but it sounds more like professional musicians who have worked together many times hitting a genius moment, Donald Byrd Dominoes a jam session. Second, Hope provides original material that helps give the record its personality.



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7 thoughts on “ Elmo Hope Sextet Informal Jazz

  1. Hope played with Rollins again, and, in October , recorded a session known as The Elmo Hope Quintet Featuring Harold Land which Pacific Jazz did not release until , along with the contents of a Jazz Messengers album.
  2. Informal Jazz is an album by jazz musician Elmo Hope, released in on Prestige Records, catalogue It has been reissued in as Two Tenors under the billing of Hope's sidemen for the session, John Coltrane and Hank creature666.deinfo: Jazz.
  3. Elmo Hope Catalog. (age 30) Elmo Hope Trio/Elmo Hope Quintet (Blue Note (J) K18P) Elmo Hope Sextet - Informal Jazz (Prestige PRLP ) Donald Byrd, trumpet; John Coltrane, Hank Mobley, tenor sax; Elmo Hope, piano; Paul Chambers, bass; Philly Joe Jones, drums.
  4. Jun 19,  · Informal Jazz by the Elmo Hope Sextet on PRLP June 19, by Fredrik. Two of my favorite tenor players on one album. And the other cats on this are a formidable bunch; Elmo Hope on piano, Donald Byrd on trumpet, Paul Chambers on double bass and Philly Joe Jones on drums. I must say, I really dig the piano playing of Elmo Hope.
  5. Concord Music Group, Inc. (part of Concord Bicycle Music since /04/01, overseeing recorded music operations) (tracks 1–4).
  6. Find album credit information for Informal Jazz - Elmo Hope, Elmo Hope Sextet on AllMusic6/
  7. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the gram Vinyl release of Informal Jazz on Discogs/5(15).

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